Newborn Enrolment with General Practice Bill – First Reading – Video 2
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Newborn Enrolment with General Practice Bill – First Reading – Video 2


cura the question is that the motion be agreed to mr. speaker Reverend dr. David Clarke speaking thank you can I say from the outset that just to be clear labor will be supporting this bill to select committee the bill the idea within the bill is one that’s hard to dispute really I mean the you know congratulate the member on bringing a sensible bill to the house that that deals with a problem that is real I do have some criticisms of it in its current formula and I will lay those out well but concerns really because hopefully we will be able to address these things at the Select Committee and I do look forward to their experience the Select Committee the Health Select Committee is generally a productive select committee and a well lead select committee I have to say looking across the house at the chair of that Health Select Committee it’s it’s a select committee that works well together in is a burly lead and so it will be good to sit down and have a look through this piece of legislation it’s actually pretty short the member who drafted it will know this holding it up for anybody who’s following this at home I mean the active Clause is really this than one page and it’s it’s you know kind of a list of instructions as to how a GB DP will will follow through to carry out the required process and the members got his earpiece in there I think as his folks have just tuned that tuned Ernie’s telling me good on him that there will double the audience tonight mr. speaker I’m sure look mr. speaker the the thing that this bill does though is something that we would hope would be happening anyway in in the concern I have and I speak many on this side of the house will share my concern is that part of the problem here is that GPS are incredibly stretched and they are underfunded this year alone they have been significantly short funded by tens of millions and the GPS themselves estimated that was about forty five million they needed to meet existing cost pressures but in the budget they only got nine million dollars and that means of course that they’re having to cut the levels of services and we know that there are underserved communities in South Auckland in our rural communities and so on that are unable to get GPS so talking about what those GPS do the niceties of when they’ve got to refer a child on for a specific treatment or when they’ve got to have an enrollment completed or and so on is is kind of important but in the bigger picture we’re nearly half of the GP workforce is expected to retire in the next ten years it is really playing at the margins and if this was obviously the government’s main priority it could pop it through in a in a moment as a piece of government legislation but instead we have it here as a member’s bill and end in its current form I have to say mr. speaker it is a toothless bill and that is one of the things I hope we will look at it’s Select Committee though I would be keen to see it properly funded the initiative that’s described in this particular bill and then I’m not sure it’s something that is on the government’s agenda but we may hear more of it as the debate progresses it’s toothless mr. speaker because it describes what has to happen if the GP can’t enroll somebody the GP is required to consult with family members to consider the appropriate general practice provider supply a list of general practices in the newborns era of residents are so requested or if they’re full and to help them find another another place where they might take their child if a particular practice is full these are requirements placed on the GP who’s already stretched and there are no penalties whatsoever for a GP who does not carry these things out in the bill there is no there is no measure there’s nothing no response if somebody sees look I can’t do it I’m too busy there’s no penalties for patients who don’t do their the apartness process on time the bill is completely toothless that lead it reads like a wish list of of how GPS ought to beast and wrong newborns in there practices and of course the GPS already know that mr. speaker the GPS are not stupid they’re smart they medically trained they know what best practice looks like and really this bill amounts to little more than a best practice guideline in its current form so I would say mr. speaker that while the idea is good what it needs is financial support and it needs incentives and and you know for those who are not compliant if it’s properly funded then you can put sanctions in place mr. speaker but in its current form it has little more merit then nutcrackers lost luggage bill here we are debating a bill in the house that has no teeth there is simply a wish list of things that the member would like GPS to do and there’s no funding following there’s no incentive to do this and there’s no sanction for those who don’t do it so there’s no penalty for not doing it mr. speaker into Tapley just that have time in the house for this bill seems a very strange thing to do that the leader of the house says it’s a really good idea he’s trying to fill out the letters that are scheduled to make it look like his government’s busy and got new ideas but mr. speaker they’re been here nine years and if this really is the best idea they have you know I think that is pretty concerning what mr. speaker in good faith is I sent the outset we will we support it because we think it could have teeth in it it could have funding that comes in behind it we could actually make this into a good thing but in its current form if this is the best thinking they have after nine years and the leader of the House says this is a good thing for the but there has to be debating then I think that seems a signal to New Zealanders that this is a government out of ideas and out of time and what we really need mr. speaker is a fresh approach a fresh approach to these issues one that actually sees let’s fund us adequately let’s make sure that that general practice has enough GPS to carry these things out in South Auckland let’s make sure that we have a plan for retaining our rural GP or building it over time and there is no plan laid out for that there is no plan because these are the people are supposed to deliver this fill mr. speaker and if half of them are retiring in the next ten years they won’t be able to do that mr. speaker that is the ridiculousness of what we’re being asked to look at here in the House today mr. speaker of course it sounds fine it sounds sensible you know if there is no room in the practice find another practice give a list to the to the person coming in seeking to enroll their person of other practices in the area not very practical though if you are in the middle of nowhere in a small town and there is no GP for hundreds of kilometers mr. speaker that is that is the situation there that could be brought up in the situation described in this bill if if there is no GP vir to carry that out and there’s no penalty mr. speaker as I said earlier on there’s no penalty for the GP who doesn’t carry out these things mr. speaker in the leader of the house is suggesting we could be pregnant Senate Select Committee I think the mirror that the leader of the house knows that this Bill’s got a few we holes in it is it stands I think he he senses that that that it’s not a great tone at home mr. speaker it is it is a it is a light bill and then it expresses an idea and then in those few short paragraphs we can see that there’s the the seed pets of an idea but it does need to be fully funded and I think that’s the point I would like to emphasize and this first reading speech mr. speaker if the health system isn’t fully funded we cannot expect these GPS who are actually not even there in great numbers to be continued doing more with lease when there’s no workforce to deliver I don’t mr. speaker we’re arguing something that really really is a little bit trivial using the house as time mr. speaker I’m sure others will have something to add to this as well so I shan’t thought some too much Don Imus speak but other than to say I do look forward to to having the debate in the House Select Committee it is a very productive committee and the member Simon O’Connor at the back chairs as well we will I’m sure have a lively debate about this and I hope the government can be persuaded to put a little bit of money behind this mr. speaker the health system has been underfunded by 2.3 billion dollars by hours about the fourth time you’ve repeated that not the 3.3 billion dollars mr. speaker done that bill that mr. speaker is a serious amount of money and if money doesn’t go into the system we can’t expect it to continue to deliver on these things no no it’s in mr. speaker Simon O’Connor mr. speaker I’m pleased to take

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