The Terrifying Threat To Pregnant Black Women & Their Babies | Shady | Refinery29
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The Terrifying Threat To Pregnant Black Women & Their Babies | Shady | Refinery29


Some doctors, some nurses don’t want you to
ask any questions. Our grandparents didn’t really want to go
to the doctor because they never trusted the doctor. So then that got passed on to us. I felt like your biases is why my son is not here. Across the country, many black women are trying
to realize the American dream, having a family. The problem is, far too many of them are going
into the hospital and not making it back out. Income, prior health issues, genetics, none of it explains the disparity black women
face. The one thing that could is something this
country has struggled with for centuries. Do you feel racism plays a role in the care
that black women are receiving? I do. I really do. Meet Charles Johnson. He’s a super dad. Can you say hi? Hi. Can I shake your hand? How are you? Good. Nice to meet you. A single father, he’s raising two boys on
his own. But it’s not how he wanted it to be. I married a woman that was far smarter than
me, that really challenged me to be a better person in every aspect of my life. And I depended on her for so much. Charles and his wife Kira had a whole life
planned together. We always talked about raising men that would
change the world. That’s what we thought of, and everything
that we talked about was focused and centered around that. Two years ago, everything changed when they
went to the hospital for the birth of their second son. She said, “Don’t leave the hospital without me.” And that was her way of saying– Don’t leave the hospital without– Don’t leave without… I don’t leave until we leave together. The thought that I would walk into that hospital
and not be able to keep my promise, for me it was just this feeling that I just let her
down in the worst possible way ever. What was supposed to be a routine C-section
went terribly wrong. Kira was bleeding internally. Charles alleges no one took appropriate action. Throughout the day, throughout me watching
my wife’s condition deteriorate, at no point did the doctor or the medical staff’s sense
of urgency heighten for my wife. Ultimately, Kira died after being taken into
surgery. For them to fail to value her in that manner
to this length is something that I really, even to this day
almost three years later, have a very tough time getting my mind around. It’s a pattern of lack of compassion, lack
of transparency, and then failing to act. Her energy is definitely in that place. You could see that her kids have her spirit. Hearing about their love story and their plans
for their family, it’s infuriating because I think her death was completely preventable. I don’t know. It just feels really wrong. The terrifying thing is, Kira’s story could
be mine. A woman who’s educated, in love, financially
stable, and black. You may or may not know, but black mothers
are three times more likely to die than white mothers of delivery complications. And black infants are twice as likely to die
during infancy than white babies. Researchers hypothesize that poor birth outcomes among black families could
be linked to income, prior health issues, or genetics. But what a growing body of research shows
is far more disheartening. Black women have said that they have told
their doctors that they were in pain, that they were uncomfortable, that something was
wrong, and that they weren’t listened to. I think that there’s a lot of unconscious
bias that sort of sets up a situation where you hear what you think you hear. You know, “Oh, she’s always complaining
of pain,” or these preconceived notions that actually work against the patient. Racial bias, or racism, making assumptions
about the person in front of you based on stereotypes, sometimes without even realizing it. It might be hard for some to imagine, but
if we need proof of how racism has affected the perception of black pain, we don’t have
to look very far. There’s been a long tradition, going back
at least as far as the United States was founded, of white physicians treating black patients like they are subhuman, that they do not feel
pain like white people. And particularly, the tradition that happens
time and time again of a black population being isolated and treated like lab animals. One of the most infamous instances of white
physicians experimenting on enslaved women is Dr. Marion Sims, who began in the 1830s. Having access to enslaved women, he was very
interested in a series of gynecological diseases and abnormalities that he then used surgery,
without any anesthetic, to try to repair. There was no anesthetic? No anesthetics. The father of gynecology. He used black women to learn. These were actually slaves who were being violated. Using the black body as a source of experimentation
isn’t limited to Dr. Sims. From the infamous Tuskegee Study, a secret
experiment on untreated syphilis in black men, to what become known as the
Mississippi Appendectomy, in which black women were sterilized without consent. The black American experience has too often
been a painful one. I don’t think our medical industry is any
more racist than our country. Our country has had a very complicated history
of how we’ve treated black people. It’s an issue that few people like to admit
still exists, but the consequences of which are bigger than I could’ve imagined. I think the other thing that is important
to sort of bring into the conversation is that maternal mortality is actually the tip
of the iceberg. Thirty-five-year-old Roxie is pregnant for
the second time. It was just last year that her first pregnancy
ended with complications. I could tell that something was going on that day because I just woke up feeling weird, and
not even feeling weird physically. It was just like something in me could just
tell that this day was just not going to be right. My water breaks, and it was like a gush. I was trying to tell myself that this is not
what’s happening because it was so early. Roxie and her husband went to the emergency
room hoping for the best. When I went for the ultrasound, that’s when
they discovered that he had no heartbeat. The doctor comes in, and he’s just like, “I’m so sorry. There’s no heartbeat.” And, you know, we were just devastated. At 17 weeks Roxie delivered her son, Lee. And he was perfect, honestly. He was just a tiny little baby. He had ten fingers, ten toes. You know, he had a little cute nose and mouth,
and his eyes were closed, of course. And they hadn’t developed yet. But he was perfect. He was like a little baby. The sad reality is Roxie isn’t alone. I didn’t think that I would lose two babies
and almost lose my life. All of these women have lost babies, some
more than one. And the truth is, it feels like just another
thing black women have to deal with. When it comes to just how you show up in the
world, we all are battling these stereotypes that are already laid out for us, whether
it’s the mammy, the Jezebel, strong black woman, angry black woman,
whatever you want to call it. But I think that plays a role in how we get
pregnant, stay pregnant, bring a baby home. Absolutely. I mean, I love what you said. We carry it, we carry it. We carry it on our shoulders, we carry in
our gut. Black women tend to hold things inside, and
anytime you’re holding in anger, fear, grief, all of these emotions, different things just
begin to develop because of stress that hasn’t been dealt with. Researchers are starting to see what these
woman already know. There’s been data that suggests lifelong
stress or generations of stress has been associated with increased risk for preterm labor and
preterm birth. But I think the data would suggest that racism
is a long-term stress, which can lead to poor health outcomes. Stress looks a lot like regular pains. My chest is tight, something in my chest hurts. And only to find out from your doctor you’re
perfectly healthy. So where are these pains coming from? Where are these migraines coming from? You’re like, “Oh crap. I can’t get pregnant because I have all
this other stuff going on.” But it’s a combination of all these other
outside stressors that are playing a role into our diet, our living. And I think that that definitely is why black
women have higher rates of infertility, and then of course why the infant and mortality
rates are the way they are today. In the early days of her pregnancy, Roxie
had been healthy and happy. But midway through her second trimester, a
lesson about freedom of speech among black football players taught at her mostly white
school sparked a controversy that made the news. It got to the point that I started receiving
emails saying that I needed to get fired. Then it started getting to the school, where
the school was receiving death threats. Just when I think, “Oh, this is about to go away,” something else would happen. I’m pretty sure a huge part of it had to do
with the fact that I’m black. It’s nearly impossible to say for sure. Was it racism? But it’s a question that black women often
have to confront in our most devastating moments. I do believe that there have been certain
instances where I may not have received the best medical care because I am a black woman. When you give birth, you’re supposed to deliver
the placenta within 30 minutes or so. I had this white male doctor who was on call at the time. He was saying that the placenta was not detaching. And it wasn’t until the next doctor came on
call, and she pressed on my stomach a few times and delivered it quickly. If all she had to do is push on my stomach
a few times to get it out, then why couldn’t he have done the same? Did he not want to touch me? I don’t know. I can remember being in the NICU with Makai. I wasn’t allowed to hold him. There are other premature babies in here being held. Why not him? I’m asking them questions about it. Then, that’s when I got the attitude like I’m bothering them, you know? They did exactly what I was always scared
of, so they ignored me. He ended up missing so many signs. Your concerns are like, hurry up, get this. And so it is frustrating. The simple act of questioning your own experience
is difficult to navigate. And these exact concerns have led black women to create a community, a safe space, so that we don’t have to worry about whether or not we’ve been given adequate care. I left that hospital, and I became my own advocate. It took, you know, three times of this for
me to actually stand up for myself. Now that all of us share our stories with
loss and fertility but also experiences in the doctor’s office, in the OBGYN office,
in the hospitals that they go to, to tell people to not go to those places, to go find a different provider that
could take care of you so that you can feel secure. What should the medical industry be doing
to address this problem? When I had my third and final child, I felt
like a needed a doula, and I didn’t get that. That was what being a midwife was about. It was a community service, and it
was a family commitment. It passed from generation to generation. It was black women helping black women. And over years that black midwives serve
in that capacity, many of them will help birth hundreds of children. So black women helping each other and by extent
helping the community. Helping the community. Black women will make a way out of no way. That is powerful. That exhibit on black midwives just blew me
away because black women will come together and solve a problem no matter what it is. It was such a reflection of who black women
have always been, of just creating this community in order to maintain our own well-being, our
children’s well-being, our community’s well-being. I thought that was incredible. With a doula by her side, it’s the kind of
tradition that Roxie is living every day. So with this pregnancy, it is a high-risk pregnancy. Not only because I suffered a loss but
because of my age also. Now, here I am at 36 weeks. Still not quite there. You still have those feelings like maybe I
just can’t have a baby. There’s still fear there that anything can
happen. It won’t be until I’m literally holding her
in my arms and she’s crying and she’s moving that I’ll really know that it’s real and that
she’s safe and healthy and happy. We are on the way to the hospital. We are actually having her today. We are definitely excited. I’m definitely scared because she is
measuring a little small. With her baby measuring in at a low birth
weight, Roxie had to deliver early. But ultimately, her daughter Ever was born
healthy and strong. I’m here in Atlanta, in good ol’ Atlanta
traffic, headed to see Roxie who just had a baby girl, Ever. And I’m so excited to meet the little baby. I can’t wait. Hi. Hello. How are you? Come on in. Oh my gosh. It was so wonderful to see her and
her beautiful baby girl, Ever. It’s really nice to see, even in the face of
so much adversity and such disheartening statistics, that there are black women out here who are having
beautiful babies and raising beautiful families. It was really encouraging to see her, especially after her loss. And just hearing her say that she didn’t let
that get her down, and she was willing to keep trying ’cause she knew she wanted to
be a mother. That just really warmed my heart. What would you say to anybody who says that
this problem is unsolvable? This problem is solvable. And we know that because we’ve seen progress
in other countries. We’ve seen progress in states that
have implemented programs. So we have the fixes, we have the tools. It’s about raising the consciousness first and foremost and letting people know
that this is a problem. I think black people have been working around
the system since we’ve been in this country, and I think the answer is challenging our
country to just get better. Do a better job of seeing us. I want to encourage black women to
make this country see us. Thanks for watching Refinery29. For more videos like this, click here. To subscribe, click here.

100 Comments

  • TheSnowFoxParty

    I'm just going to say it: The American Dream is made for White Families by White Families. It's not made for us….they dont want more black babies in this world. They are killing us on purpose. We need more black doctors.

  • Alma Kwami

    BLACK WOMEN CAN PLAN PREGNANCIES, MEANING : PREPARE YOURSELVES FOR PREGNANCY AND BIRTH.IF YOU LIVE IN A STABLE ENVIRONMENT AND CAN PROVIDE NUTRIENTS PRIOR TO PREGNANCY DO SO. REMOVE UNDESIRABLES LIKE JUNK FOOD ECT FROM YOUR DIET. ATTE ND THE PRE PREGNANT SESSIONS AND START READING ,YOU AND YOUR PARTNER.GET TO KNOW COMPLICATIONS THAT CAN OCCUR AND THE PROCESS OF BIRTH. YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO A SAFE ENVIRONMENT AND EFFICIENT PRACTITIONERS.WHEN THINGS ARE GOING WRONG , QUESTION AND SPEAK TO A SPECIALIST.BREAST IS BEST, WHY WOULD YOU EVEN ALLOW A DISCUSSION ABOUT FORMULA.HAVE A MATURE FEMALE WITH YOU FOR SUPPORT. THEIR ROLE WILL BE TO QUESTION ALSO ON YOUR BEHALF.IF YOU ARE IN PAIN , TELL THEM STRAIGHT AWAY, IF THEY ARE NOT LISTENING, SEND FOR THE SPECIALIST.SOUNDS LIKE RACISM AND PREJUDICE IS OVERT AND DOES AFFECT OUTCOME ,SO OVERT.WE HAVE PROBLEMS IN UK BUT THE TEAMS ARE MORE HUMANE AND PROFFESSIONAL .IN MOST CASES. OLDER WOMEN WHO BECOME PREGNANT, TEND TO HAVE MORE COMPLICATIONS; THEY NEED A CAREFUL PLAN OF CARE. WOMEN WITH PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL ISSUES DO TOO. WE MUST NOT BELIEVE THAT ALL WILL BE SUN AND SEA; SOMETIMES THINGS CAN CHANGE QUICKLY AND ISSUES OCCUR.THE MATERNAL DEATH RATE IN AMERICA FOR A RICH DEVELOPED COUNTRY IS TOO HIGH. ONE HAS TO THEN LOOK AT THEIR STANDARDS SET AS TO THE BEST PRACTISE. MAYBE YOUR TEACHING HOSPITALS MIGHT BE BETTER.IN UK, I MUST ADMIT ,THAT THE MIDWIFERY PRACTISE WAS SECOND TO NONE.TODAY 2019 THINGS ARE CHANGING. ALWAYS QUERY WHY.BLACK WOMEN LOVE AND LOOK AFTER YOURSELVES; QUESTION ALL THINGS AND YOU CAN QUIETLY AND ASSERTIVELY MAINTAIN YOUR RIGHTS.KEEP A RECORD OF ALL THINGS.WHY WOULD YOU BE IN LABOUR IN A HOSPITAL ON YOUR OWN. WHY WOULD YOUR SUPPORTERS STAND BY AND ALLOW ABUSE.YOU ALL NEED TO FORM A GROUP AND BRING YOUR BAD EXPERIENCES TO THE ATTENTION OF THE HOSPITAL BOARD ; IF NO SATISFACTION, THE MEDIA AND LAW. SOUNDS TO ME LIKE A 100 YEARS AGO.I AM AWARE THAT YOU HAVE UNITS OF EXCELLENCE OVER THERE. GUESS TO ACCESS ONE MUST BE ANOTHER MOUNTAIN.REMEMBER THE POWER OF PRAYERS PRIOR TO ENTERING AND LEAVING THE HOSPITALS .HOPE TO HEAR MORE POSITIVE REPORTS.WHY NOT MAKE A CONTRACT WITH A MIDWIFE .🤔

  • SpoiledCurlyGurl

    I'm having my 6th child and I will say I had this issue with my 5th child. Those nurses ignored my pain and ignored my pain when I told them I was in labor and the baby was coming. They literally told me I was "thinking" myself into labor and I needed to calm down and "will" the baby to stay put. Lol it was the most ridiculous thing I had ever heard. I ended up having to be hurried in for delivery, never got my epidural, and mocked when I screamed from the pain. I never had a baby without an epidural so I was unprepared. The doctor said "Oh this one is small!" like basically stop whining since the baby isn't even big. My husband hadn't had a chance to make it before the baby came so it was just me dealing with being bullied by doctors and nurses. I can tell you with certainty that this delivery will not go that way and I will assert myself with my own care and my husband will not leave my side.

  • Tasha V

    With my first daughter I felt Like the doctors and nursing didnt care about me one bit…… I just felt Something was really off… all my nurses and doctors were white. I was in labor for 3 whole damn days . Some people say that they could've helped me deliver sooner but didnt…. anyways I'm pregnant with my second child and afraid of what's to come. But I'm glad to hear these stories so I know I'm not alone . 1

  • Tasha V

    Also they wouldn't give me any pain medication after i had my baby said that most woman dont need it meanwhile. I went through a very hard labour worst pain ever. I had tears they didnt care about that. I'm terrified about What's to come with this next labor /delivery after care ect….

  • Eolh Stteb

    I don't trust doctors at all
    We are Guinea pigs for them. Real doctor was in the 60s, 70 , after that . its all about are body parts. But the sad part of this is who is buying up body parts ???and where is it all going?? where is all of are blood is going?? These are some deep as question that we need to be asking. At one time when they was drawing blood they had 2 tubes now its 6 tubes of are blood? Why and you need so.much of are blood?? Where is it all going. Explain to me Why is it only Africa America sitting in all these dialysis officer in are neighborhood..they have dialysis damn near on every corner in black community?why…do you put all your faith in these doctors rhats taking you out.know your blood type .. If you don't no ask for it there are other ways to clean your blood. If they tell you they don't no or they refuse to give you that information that should be a flag going up in your head before they give you another damn 💊

  • Eolh Stteb

    I had told my doctor my problem they don't listen..i walk out and start taking care of myself.i am my own doctor . my great great grandmother use herbs.so i use herbs,roots and change my food. Drink water.. You no your body..they are taking us out . we don't need football player we need doctor ,nurses in are neighborhood. Ask questions stop taking all of those pills they are given you . ask the cause and effect of every problem that you are having if they can't tell you what caused it and effect of it walk away and make sure you get your baby placenta that's your put on ice . research you can make money off it yourself. Make soup out of it. Make juice out of it make pills out of it . it is very healthy for mothers i want to tell you more but i can't say i hsve said to much as is. Research stop trying to live like the Caucasian that's how they base you off of as them.but we are not them.

  • Monique Alecia

    I am so glad I watched this but I'm also so scared. I live in Canada where we are lucky enough to have free healthcare however I've experience this time and time again where doctors and physicians do not take my health issues seriously. I diagnosed myself with PCOS as a teenager and repeatedly expressed symptoms, pain etc and no doctor took me serious. They simply prescribed birth control and told me I was fine. Now I'm almost 30 years old and being told I may never be able to carry a baby full term much less even get pregnant. We need to take our health serious and I pray we have more black doctors or just doctors in general that will listen to us when we express something is wrong. Remember you know your body better than anyone.

  • Giovanna J

    This is sooooo factual. Every time I go to the doctor I feel this way. And any good ones you find they are over loaded with patients. Appointments are hard to get.

  • Gina Grey

    I don’t know how but my body started hurting in my reproductive area while watching this! Felt like menstral cramps! This is soul draining! Having a white mother, I wonder what would have happen to her if she had revealed that she was married to a black man and was looking to deliver a black baby to her doctor.

  • Locs ForLyphe

    Could the increased rate of abortions among Black American women have anything to do with the increased rate of complications in wanted pregnancies among these same black women?

  • Candice Barnes

    The moment they spoke about black midwives, I had a tear in my eye. I'm literally studying to become a midwife and it'll be an amazing feeling to know that not only I'll be promoting women empowerment but for my sisters to know that everything will be OK and I'll be there.

  • Roc Stoutamire

    Thanks for sharing, I have had a few bad experiences at the hospital myself. I've even reported them. At the time I didn't think about it. Now that it has happened more than three times I realize that it is a problem and I am not the only one that has experienced it. Smh.

  • v t

    In the Pearson Nursing Concept book, in the area of pain care, it states that when black people complaints about pain is an exaggeration. It also states that Jewish people are 'too demanding when it comes to pain'. It lists all ethnic groups, but says nothing about white or European people, which speaks volumes. This book can be found on Amazon. As a black woman currently in nursing school, I can assure you that NONE of my patients will ever go through this. This type of treatment of people is disgusting. I have always spoken up for myself regarding treatment, and always will.

  • Symone Bailey

    This is a huge reason why choice is so important man. My grandma lost a child, my mother almost lost my brother and was high risk for 4 of her 5 pregnancies, she got sick with one. My cousins eclampsia almost killed her, my sisters preeclampsia caused bleeding on her brain and the doctors never listened to her during her pregnancy when she fainted and had severe migraines, she was also 17. Honestly, I’m terrified to have children as a black woman. And it’s so much scarier knowing the government is trying to force birth on people when we’re all dying in the process. My aunt lost her first child, had two, got an iud and still got pregnant. Having a history like this is terrifying

  • Tawanda Clark

    Wow…… Just wow. These stories are just heartbreaking 😢. I was blessed to have seven healthy beautiful babies via C section at a regional community hospital without any complications. I had 5 miscarriages before, but they were very early on in term. It was sad but it was nothing I nor the staff could do. The only few times I had a problem was with a couple staff not following directions based on what I wanted dealing with recovery/how to deal with me based on what I already knew about myself such as thin veins. My advice to previous pregnant mothers are to rest, eat healthy, and never accept any kind of mistreatment whatsoever. Follow your instincts and do whatever you need to get the care you need.

  • Lee Steal

    Is it sad that the only time I was treated badly during my pregnancy was by Black hospital staff. Noone else treated me badly, noone else ignored me. This is horrible though, so horrible. OMG

  • R T.

    To all my beautiful black Sisters your fearfuly and wonderful made ,Loved by your Sister's and your Heavenly Father.
    Sending out love 💕💕

  • Tikeya Winston

    My mom never went through this with me and my older siblings when her ob was black. But her last two deliveries gave her and my younger siblings complications.my mom almost died with both of them,nd yes,the ob was white…im currently 21 weeks with my first and I wouldn't be comfortable with a white doctor/nurse. Not to sound racist..but i'd rather be safe than sorry.

  • Posja Darko Boateng

    It’s like a curse to be black in America……I’m confused 🤷‍♀️ the things my fellow black people have to go through…in their daily lives …like why??

  • evangeline48

    I have to share my personal experience with the situation. My oldest daughter who is now 25, by the grace of God, had delivered a baby girl 2 years ago, around Christmas 2017. She was in Minnesota when she gave birth to her daughter. She said that she had gone to the doctor to complain of pain and discomfort. The doctors and other medical staff blew it off and sent her home. She had to go back in to give birth at 26 weeks! But it was too late for the baby! My grandchild was too premature to survive outside of the womb! Now my daughter has to live with this pain everyday, and it just breaks my heart! She should not have had to go through this! Her baby should not have died! I will say this, people: I believe that the solution to the situation is more black Healthcare professionals – particularly doctors. Js

  • yahannah yahannah

    Stop wearing those weaves. 27 pieces eyelashes. Tatoos, nail salon fake nails see the bible isaith 3. See YouTube channel
    Truemessageofchrist7

  • yahannah yahannah

    There are hair and dietary laws along with laws/commandments are not done away with. MID WIVES ROCK. MY DAUGHTER IS ONE AND I AM A FORMER ADVOCATE WHEN IT WAS UNPOPULAR. BREAST FEEDING COMING BACK TOO

  • Barbara Gremaud

    Roxy's baby is gorgeous!
    I'm a homebirth midwife (CPM) in school to become a nurse-midwife (CNM). Midwifery care has been shown to reduce bias and we need more black midwives in the United States. I'm a white woman but I care about racial disparities and hope to make a difference with my work. Most women pay out of pocket for homebirth, so it is not accessible to the majority of families – about 2% of babies are born at home. One of the reasons I am becoming a nurse-midwife is so that I can provide midwifery care to women of all incomes and demographics, not just the select few who can choose homebirth. I will likely miss home birth but I want to reach as many women as possible.

  • Richella Wesson

    You have to think in reverse, now if I sold women on the right to abort, then don't they have the same right to kill you!!!'

  • Lifeaccordingtojosie

    I encourage women to seek out of hospital care such as delivering at home or in a birthing center. I also encourage women to seek a midwife and doula that not only looks like them, but shares some of the same values and belief systems as they do. Find a midwife that is going to allow you to be in total control of the type of care that you receive. Someone that will guide you, but ultimately allows you to make the best decisions for you and your baby. And if you're unable to deliver out of the hospital due to being high risk or other factors, find a doctor that you can connect with energetically that shares some of your values and beliefs.

  • Shakia Taylor

    I feel like they always want to give black women csection! My great-grandma was a mid-wife she lived till 102and1/2 and she never went to the hospital or doctors office she was very healthy

  • EagerBeaver2218

    This is very true. That's why you have to have African or African American gynecologists, obstetricians, pediatricians as your primary care doctors. They understand your peculiar needs. Never fall for that line of thought that "a Doctor is a Doctor". No, they're not!

  • Kim Weir

    I believe this 100%. I see racism so often & I do believe many have unconscious racism. Racism is still a major problem in this nation. I appreciate video & will share it for awareness.

  • Danielle Brown

    I have never expressed this and I have 3 children but my last child I made it my mission to not have another C-Section, my doctors office didn’t do VBacks so I had to find me a doctor who would deliver my baby vaginal naturally and he did just that a loving Caring black doctor. I was a high risk pregnancy as well I had to go see a high risk specialist every month for my whole pregnancy, maybe it’s parts of where you live to get bad treatment from doctors but I have yet to experience this bad treatment from any Doctors or Midwifes.

  • Nikki Hitchcock

    Dude health care in america is fucking sexist! I mean white women who are rich are still dying in hospitals! As fuck, and than change your skin color or status..holy shit, i mean third world countries are safer to give birth in!

  • Jody Schulz

    I live in Australia, im curious if any of this also happens in my country. I would be extremely disappointed. I know a lot of medical vasitions, I've had 2 babies and both were treated with respect (most of the time)

  • Nikki Hitchcock

    Honestly having home births or birth centers is consistently safer! People shouldnt be going to a place that people go to die or are sick…life shouldn't be in the same place..

  • Nikki Hitchcock

    Plus the level of advertising and such that steer black women away from breastfeeding their babies is fucked up! like breastfeeding it honestly so wonderful for you and baby! you get to bond, helps with post partum depression, so many antibodies in mommys milk, helps to contract your uterus, reduces sids, just so much, but so many black women are discouraged or told its gross etc

  • Q. Ayesha Nnamani

    This shit stupid and it’s not just black women. Second if y’all feel this strongly bout it do like other race of ppl and make or encourage your children to be doctors astronauts librarians pharmacists etc not b-ball players rappers and the next Beyoncé y’all killing your own race by doing that.
    Let them know how important it is to be those titles. Problem solved
    Or just move back to Africa it’s better there

  • Tamra The Consultant

    I thank God that I had a black female doctor that delivered my son. No issues with smooth delivery. My son has never been vaccinated to this day. He is a strong healthy boy at age 11. I pray this for all black women who wish to have children. 🙏🙌❤

  • 泡Bubbles 泡

    Kira honestly looked like a pretty and intelligent woman, the fact that the doctors never took action is just more than stupid,

  • loliwe moyo

    Because medicine is so biased against the black mother in the birthing system it is imperative to have a male relative to advocate throughout the process.

  • lakeysia s

    I’m both saddened and very hurt by what’s happened to these ladies and their babies. My heart cries fr our ancestors that were at the mercy of the white men who practiced on them without anesthesia like we are some lab rats. I can’t stand it!!!

  • Nacho Biz

    It’s minority’s period Hispanic, Native Americans, and black (Israelite) women that experience this. Unless we get care by our own people.

  • Tria Moore

    I’ve experienced this this last month I got a hysterectomy, 11 days later Appendectomy and 7 days later diagnosed with Pulmonary Embolism due to neglect of therapy, care and pain management I even had words with a CNA and the surgeon who did my appendectomy as if my pain and condition wasn’t that serious yet I was transported from one hospital to the next so it had to be something serious and I honestly go to the doctor on a prayer I get someone with compassion and empathy vs a robotic doctor who I’m just a number I’ve learned to press through the pains because in the worse pain I’ve been treated like it’s not that serious even though the pain at one point challenged my marriage I’m a widow now however I can remember being a new mom and newlywed and sex being so painful if felt like a knife penetrating and I got no answers or surgery till my son was 12 REALLY! To be in pain and ignored 2 high risk pregnancies and treated like I’m being a drama queen living with a disease for years other doctors said it wasn’t anything impressive in the results for years it’s just hurtful to feel it safer to push through the pain than try to seek help because you feel your cries will be ignored or minimized

  • Kay Jay

    That baby girl is just precious! I’m so happy she has a blessing after so much grief. God help us with the oppressive and racist system we have to live in.

  • Liz Keith

    do not trust vaccines. there's a huge problem with adverse reactions, especially in black babies. the healthiest kids are the unvaccinated. investigate before you vaccinate.

  • Abigail Gage

    This documentary really broke my heart. Racism is still alive and kicking, just in a subtle way. Fortunately for me I did not have this experience delivering my little one. I had an Asian OBGYN , she also delivered my baby she was absolutely amazing. The nursing staff at the hospital were also very nice and took good care of me. I'm not sure if my husband's race has anything to do with it. I guess I'll never know. But my heart bleeds to see what black woman experience in this day and age.

  • boomboomdiboom

    This is not just a problem in the USA. I’m an American currently living in Belgium. My water broke when I was 8 months pregnant in August 2019 and the staff didn’t administer proper care during that time. My son died as a result from septicemia because the doctors and nurses on staff refused to listen to the signs and symptoms I was experiencing associated with infection. I ended up staying in the hospital for two weeks because I also contracted septicemia. I thought that I was free from experiencing implicit bias because I was in another country, but what I experienced is proof that this happens every where. It is not safe to be a black woman in this world.

  • Liz Keith

    do not take your babies to "well child" visits if there's no problem. those visits are for vaccines… if your doctor/nurse says they won't take care of your child unless you get them vaccinated, then find a new dr. so many kids that are never vaccinated, never get sick, even the small stuff like ear infections. breast feed and take plenty of vit c yourself. make sure kids get enough vit c and vit A.

  • M. Sparks

    I feel sorry for black people in America…This is so scary..am Kenyan but this gives my stomach a fear and sadness I can't explain.

  • Mz. ajka

    I have family that is real reluctant to go to a doctor and I still have those fears thats y I go doctors that are non white and when I decide to have a family imma try to have my baby at home or at a birthing centers

  • Boneta Applebum

    I am 10 weeks pregnant today, in the beginning of my pregnancy I had some bleeding which I couldn’t figure out where it was coming from but when I went to the doctor the nurse practitioner that I’ve never seen before told me I had bacteria vaginosis, and that she couldn’t prescribe antibiotics because of how early on I was she didn’t reassure me at all! I bled again and went in for an early scan thank god the baby was okay but they still don’t know till this day why I bled and I found out from my actual doctor that she COULD have still given me the antibiotics if that’s what was really wrong smh

  • BoiDv

    I’m just utterly DISGUSTED to the fact that patients are being discriminated and even compromised when it comes to delivering babies!!!! I work in the medical field and believe me we have training and the most discussed topic is about treating every patient with RESPECT! Never discriminate by sex, age, income, and above all race! How dare these doctors who are trusted the most is neglecting and mal practicing!!! THESE DOCTORS AND BURSES SHOULD HAVE BEEN REPORTED SHAME ON YOU!!

  • Beulah Hephz

    This will probably be the only place that I will
    ever be able to voice this I was 40 weeks pregnant I came to my full 9 months of my pregnancy I went to every doctors appointment all of the doctors we're all white people they would always say that all ! was! fine !
    with my pregnancy then tell me this !! You Pale Face Devils!
    why is it that one week before I was due to give birth to my son he stopped moving in my womb!
    those white red medical devils killed my baby and I will never Forget it!
    As A Brown Skinned Woman I will never get pregnant in this Wicked Pale faced USA Country Ever Again!💔 NEVER

  • Whitney D

    I suggest Black doctors, Black nurses, it will make a difference. To help our sisters out there. Wicked People still exist, but the price that you will pay, is bigger then what you did. Heartless and stupid. Proverbes 11:27 He who earnestly seeks good finds Favor, But trouble Will come to him who seeks Evil. God bless you

  • belle air

    The most messed up part is that our enslaved ancestors were used as gini pigs for modern gynaecology yet this is how they treat us

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